Thursday, November 24, 2016

Full time Chaplain Position Opening

Go to cshospice.org to apply for this exciting Facility Chaplain position.

Cornerstone Hospice and Palliative Care, Inc. is seeking a mature, well qualified Chaplain to serve patients in facilities in the Polk County, FL, area.  MDiv. or similar, plus 3 units of CPE

Wednesday, November 16, 2016

Best Practice for Providing Care for Patients in Long-term Care Facilities at Thanksgiving


The patients we serve in LTC facilities include: memory care patients, ALF patients, and independent living patients.  Usually, at Thanksgiving the memory care patients go home for the holiday or the family comes to the facility to be with their loved one.  The facility provides the meal which his pureed.  In the ALF and independent, we follow the protocols for providing care for home patients.  (see below)

Collaboration between the Chaplain and Social Worker is the key to serving the patients who will be alone.  Use the IDT for initiating planning sometime in October and finalize early in November so effort is focused on the patient and not the plan prior to Thanksgiving.



 
Patients at Home—(Going the extra mile for them)

For patients still living at home Thanksgiving can be anything but a happy holiday.  The circumstances of the patient and why they are alone at this holiday come into play in your pastoral care.

v  Are they alienated from their family members?

v  Are they separated due to distance from family members?

v  You probably have broached the subject of family issues with them.  Thanksgiving will bring emotions to the surface weeks before the actual holiday.  Employ listening skills.  They are not looking for you to fix things.  Provide the spiritual and existential support they need.  Your winsome and wise counsel will help them through the emotional pain.

v  If they cannot provide a meal for themselves and would be open to it, collaborate with the Social Worker as they have a concurrent program to provide meals for patients.

v  Provide a card, if possible.  Some faith communities make cards for “shut-ins” and if appropriate ask for as many as needed.

v  A phone call on Thanksgiving from you or the on call Chaplain would provide support.



 

Best Practice for Providing Care for Hospice House Patients at Thanksgiving


The Chaplain will support patients and families at this holiday recognizing that all may be suffering emotionally not being together at home.  There are at least two scenarios:  the patient with a family and a patient with no family.  Each scenario requires that the Chaplain be aware of these circumstances and provides a compassionate and gracious presence.

The patient with family present for them

The following will serve as guidelines for Chaplains, even though, the experienced Chaplain may find these to be second nature.

v Employ inter-active listening

v Provide an empathetic pastoral presence

v Facilitate the actions the family would like to take for Thanksgiving. 

v Work with the Hospice House staff to ensure they are aware of what the plan is so they can assist.

v Bear in mind this will most likely be the last Thanksgiving the family and patient will celebrate together and let that truth dictate all you do.

 The patient who is alone with no family

o   Recognize we can’t fix circumstances, but we will do what we do best in providing a loving and encouraging presence for the patient.

o   Should the patient want to discuss the issue that he or she will be alone for Thanksgiving, provide an empathetic pastoral presence and use your best listening skills.

o   Plan for what you will do on Thanksgiving for these patients.  Most HH patients cannot enjoy eating anymore, but they do enjoy the presence of the Chaplain.  Be sure you see the patient to provide support.

 

 

Best Practice for Providing Care for Patients at Thanksgiving (general statement)


Patients at Home—(Going the extra mile for them)

For patients still living at home Thanksgiving can be anything but a happy holiday.  The circumstances of the patient and why they are alone at this holiday come into play in your pastoral care.

v  Are they alienated from their family members?

v  Are they separated due to distance from family members?

v  You probably have broached the subject of family issues with them.  Thanksgiving will bring emotions to the surface weeks before the actual holiday.  Employ listening skills.  They are not looking for you to fix things.  Provide the spiritual and existential support they need.  Your winsome and wise counsel will help them through the emotional pain.

v  If they cannot provide a meal for themselves and would be open to it, collaborate with the Social Worker as they have a concurrent program to provide meals for patients.

v  Provide a card, if possible.  Some faith communities make cards for “shut-ins” and if appropriate ask for as many as needed.

v  A phone call on Thanksgiving from you or the on call Chaplain would provide support.